Why Vitamin D Is Important During The Lockdown

3 minute
Read
raja-tilkian-pL8xTxkUIH4-unsplash.jpg

First things first. Why does your body need Vitamin D? 

  1. Healthy bones

Vitamin D plays an essential role in maintaining calcium as well as phosphorus levels in the blood. This, in turn, contributes to strong, healthy bones. You NEED vitamin D for your intestines to absorb as well as retain calcium and without it, one would be at risk of causing their bones to soften. In simple words, without sufficient amounts of this Vitamin, you could have poor bone density and weak muscles. 

  1. Promotes Immune System Health

Studies show that Vitamin D has a protective effect against the influenza virus. The American Academy of Allergy Asthma and Immunology (AAAAI) also suggests that there exists evidence pointing towards a connection between low vitamin D and an increased risk of allergic sensitization. Besides this, regular sources of Vitamin D also have anti-inflammatory benefits to your body. 

  1. Supports Brain and Nervous System

There is a correlation between winter and negative moods for a reason. The lack of sufficient Vitamin D from sunlight causes people to have increased sleepiness and sleep difficulties. This is primarily because Vitamin D helps enhance mood, and also promotes nervous system health. 

  1. Respiration and Cardiovascular Health

One of the biggest roles of Vitamin D is regulating the immune system. In doing so, the body is less susceptible to immunity-related conditions like acute or chronic respiratory complications. Respiration: the highest prioritized consideration of the human body requires Vitamin D. It basically helps you breathe better. Need we say more? 

What are some common symptoms of a Vitamin D Deficiency? 

  • Repeated infection or allergies
  • fatigue
  • bone/ back pain
  • bad mood (that occurs often)
  • impaired wound healing
  • hair loss
  • muscle pain

Sensible sun exposure on bare skin for around 5–10 minutes, 2–3 times per week, allows most people to produce sufficient vitamin D. However, vitamin D breaks down quite quickly, meaning that stores can run low, especially in winter.

It is natural that during the course of this nationwide lockdown, you can't get enough sunlight to get your daily dose of vitamin D like you normally would. Vitamin D deficiency can take a serious toll on your health. 

What can you do to fight a Vitamin D Deficiency? (Besides getting natural sunlight)

A list of foods that help boost Vitamin D are:

  • fatty fish, such as salmon, mackerel, and tuna
  • egg yolks
  • cheese
  • beef liver
  • mushrooms
  • fortified milk
  • fortified cereals and juices

Below are some general guidelines for how much Vitamin D your body needs:

Vitamin D Recommendations

IOM

FDA

Endocrine Society

 

(RDA)

(RDI)

(Daily Allowance)

Infants

   

0-6 months

 

400 IU

400-1000 IU

6-12 months

 

400 IU

400-1000 IU

Children

   

1-3 years

600 IU

600 IU

600-1000 IU

4-8 years

600 IU

800 IU

600-1000 IU

Adults

   

9-18 years

600 IU

800 IU

600-1000 IU

19-70 years

600 IU

800 IU

1500-2000 IU

>70 years

800 IU

800 IU

1500-2000 IU

Pregnancy

   

14-18 years

600 IU

600 IU

600-1000 IU

19-50 years

600 IU

600 IU

1500-2000 IU

Lactation*

   

14-18 years

600 IU

600 IU

600-1000 IU

19-50 years

600 IU

600 IU

1500-2000 IU

Besides the consumption of Vitamin D rich foods, you can even resort to supplements if necessary: 

Two forms of vitamin D are available for supplementation: vitamin D2 and vitamin D3. Although they differ in structure and source, both are converted, by the liver, into the same form of vitamin D that is measured in the blood to determine a person’s vitamin D status. 

Vegans and others who prefer a plant-based source of vitamin D typically choose to supplement with vitamin D2, compared to animal-based vitamin D3 sources. 

Multivitamins, on the other hand, include either 400, 500, or 1000 IU vitamin D in the form of D2 or D3 or a combination of both. 

What every source you choose, ensure you don't go overboard fueled by the lack of sunlight. Vitamin D is important, yes, but it's imperative that the supply is in prescribed amounts only. 

We hope this was helpful. 

image-description
report Report this post